The mammogram is often times what will determine the level of difficulty in terms of a woman’s battle with breast cancer. Early detection through a timely procedure can mean a positive outcome while detecting a late stage tumor can mean a difficult and possible losing battle. Oftentimes the quality and accuracy of the image depends on a few key factors such as:

 

  • Equipment quality
  • Breast Density
  • Location of the tumor
  • Stage of the tumor
  • How well the image is read

 

At first glance these factors don’t necessarily seem like they are in the same neighborhood but the truth is that they are. So what can the patient expect to see in a mammogram image? For one thing the patient will see lighter masses because of the density issue. Some of the key issues to explain to patients are:

 

  • A mammogram of a normal, fatty breast will contain dark areas, known as normal fatty issues.
  • The lighter areas are dense tissue containing lobes and ducts.

 

It’s vital when getting the image to explain how age, breast density, and shape play a role in terms of the diagnosis. The density of breast tissue can make it really impossible to see if there is or if there isn’t a cancerous lesion present. An image with high density is common in younger women.

 

Abnormal mammograms tend to be associated with possible cancerous tumors by patients but the fact is that sometimes it may be that the image itself is revealing calcifications. A calcification is not a tumor but rather tiny bits of calcium forming clusters. The worst case scenario is that calcification is a benign early stage. The outcome of the calcification will likely be explained in a follow up comparison procedure that’s done after three months of initial discovery.

 

While equipment itself cannot heal the patient, it is vital for the doctor to have the very best equipment they possibly can. A re furbished mammography system that’s been thoroughly inspected and made to function like new, or better can mean the difference between a quality image and a hard to read image.

 

If you have any questions about mammography systems or any other diagnostic imaging equipment please feel free to give us a call. Our team of experts here at Amber Diagnostics looks forward to answering any questions you may have.

 

Bobby Serros
President/CEO
407.438.7847
bobbys@amberusa.com

 

References:

http://breastcancer.about.com/od/mammograms/ig/Mammogram-Images/

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