With diagnostic imaging procedures there is a small risk of developing cancer due to the exposure to radiation. Over the last several years studies have been conducted that show that procedures such as the CT scan can present a risk of developing future cancer, especially in kids. While there are measures that are being taken in order to control radiation doses, there is still that worry a CT scan will lead to some sort of untimely demise. There is proof to indicate that while there is a real risk of cancer, it’s outweighed by the need for acute treatment.

 

With complex conditions the risks of taking a turn for the worst only increases if certain measures are not taken. A lot of the studies that have been used to determine cancer risks often times use an assumption of perfect health, which can be inaccurate given the nature of some conditions. If a person is suffering from some form of trauma, a cancer, or something else, the need for a scan becomes imperative. While it’s necessary to keep that in mind, it doesn’t mean that CT scans should be abused for the purpose of turning a dollar.

 

It was stated in 500-club.org that “The rate of CT use has increased about 10 percent annually over the past 15 years, according to the study, and nearly 80 million CT scans were done in the United States alone in 2010. Computer models have estimated that up to 2 percent of cancers in the United States can be attributed to CT scanning.” A rate of 2 percent is not such an enormous number that CT scans should be placed on a danger list. It’s fair to look at the statistics of how many people die of unrelated cases every year. A complex condition can be a situation without remedy prior to any sort of scan.

 

It’s easy to understand what the fears are, given the fact that children are often times exposed to radiation that’s really meant for adults. Even though radiation is not the best proposition it’s not the worst that comes to mind. The article in 500-club.org also stated that “Examining medical records from about 22,000 patients between the ages of 18 and 35 who underwent CT scans on their chest, abdomen or pelvis, scientists determined that patients were far more likely to die from conditions prompting the scan — such as trauma, abdominal pain or difficulty breathing — than to develop a fatal cancer because of radiation from the scan itself.” This obviously means that while the risks are there, the reward of being able to being diagnose and treat a condition is far greater than the risk of cancer.

 

If you have any questions regarding CT scans, please feel free to contact us. We look forward taking your call and answering any questions that you may have.

 

Bobby Serros
President/CEO

 

407.438.7847
bobbys@amberusa.com

 

 

References:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/778770

 

http://www.500-club.org/Taxonomy/RelatedDocuments.aspx?sid=12&ContentTypeId=6&ContentID=673165

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